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Complete Beginners guide to AoS


Muto
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Disclaimer: This guide is no longer being updated by the original poster, and thus several topics or issues addressed in the guide may no longer be accurate for the current version of AoS.

 

This is a comprehensive guide to AoS for beginners. It covers all the basics of the game without going into to much detail about specific heroes, items, builds, etc. This is designed as a link you can give to any new players in order to help them understand what they are supposed to do and how the game works.

 

Feel free to link this guide to any novice players on your team who would like to learn how the game of AoS works and is played.

 

If I have made an error, feel free to correct me with a reply or private message so that I can make this guide as up to date and helpful as possible. If you have any questions, I highly encourage you to consult this FAQ guide here (warning: FAQ may not be up to date) to make sure it hasn't been asked already.

 

Comprehensive AoS Guide for Beginners

 

Table of contents

I - Introduction And Game Overview

.....Preface

.....A - Lanes

.....B - Creeps

.....C - Heroes and Stats

.....D - Ability Types

.....F - Ability Progression and Set Up

.....E - Understanding the UI

II - Choosing Your Hero

.....A - Strength Heroes

.....B - Agility Heroes

.....C - Intelligence Heroes

III - Understanding Talents

IV - Purchasing Items

V - How to Play Basics

.....A - Setting up your hero

.....B - "laning Phase"

.....C - Mid to late game.

VI - Quick Tips

VII - Basic Game and hero Mechanics

....A - Basic Game Mechanics

....B - Hero and ability mechanics

VIII - Stat mechanics

 

I - Introduction and Game Overview

Preface: What is a AoS?

Aeon of Storms (Common known as AoS) is a Starcraft II mod that emulates DoTA style games. DoTA is a style of game in which players must use unique heroes and items in order to fight each other in a grand arena and eventually destroy the enemies main artifact. Two opposing teams of five players choose their heroes and fight it out. By fighting enemies and killing creeps one can progressively get more powerful until they can overcome their opponents and win the game. AoS takes a long time to learn but is the most rewarding to master. I personally have spent well over a thousand hours playing every since I started back in SotiS v 4.0.

 

While the heros change, and map changes, and the play styles changes, there are several things in this game that have remained constant and are core aspects of this game. Below you will find everything that you need to know in order to be a succesful AoS player and understand how the game works from the ground up.

 

A - Lanes

There are three routes to the enemies base called "lanes." These three lanes are: top, middle, and bottom. They are named such after the respective position on the mini-map. Each lane has it's own advantages and disadvantages depending on how they are used. Along each lane is three cannons spaced apart from each-other. On the minimap these are identified either as the purple orbs or protoss symbols.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Laningmap_zps0bfb4d87.png

Figure 1.1

 

 

As referenced earlier, each lane has it's own benefits and disadvantages. Often times, "Top" and "bottom" are referred to as long and short lanes.

 

The "Short" lane is the one in which the cannon is closest to where the creeps meet in combat. For Protoss (Lower-left) this is the bottom lane while for Zerg (upper-rigth) this is the top lane. This lane is represented by a green arrow in Figure 1.1. The top lane is the safest, as you are close to your cannon and can back out the easiest. However, it is also the hardest to push against enemy heroes as their reinforcements have more time to intercept your units. Additionally, leaving your safe-zone near your cannon to push can make you an easy target.

 

The "long" lane is the opposite, in which the cannon is the farthest from where the creeps meet in combat. For protoss this is the top lane, while for Zerg it is the bottom. This lane is represented by a red arrow in Figure 1.1 This is the most risky lane, as when pushing against your opponent you are vulnerable and your safe-zone is far away. However, if you can push back their wave their cannon is easily accessible and thus easiest to kill.

 

The "mid" lane (Yellow line) is the equivalent of two short lanes on each side, so is easiest to push against. Because it is also the closest to the shop and each team only has 5 players, this is the lane in which the player who must solo without a partner often takes. Occasionally they will take the short lane, and if they take the long lane they are morons.

 

There is a path connecting all these lanes approximately along the center divide and ending near each teams cannon on their long-lanes. This is often called the river due to the fact it has a water texture in it. It is also the primary way players get from one lane to another (although it isn't the only way) making it risky to take if you don't know where players are.

 

B - Creeps

 

There are three types of creeps in AoS: Team creeps, neutral creeps, and special creeps. There are also mobs called "Minions" which are controlled by players. Minions are specific to certain hero abilities.

 

Team Creeps are the NPC's that spawn and fight for each team. Every 20 seconds a creep wave will spawn at the beginning of each lane. After 10 seconds they will charge down their respective lanes and auto-attack any enemy they come across. As the game progresses, the creeps spawns get progressively larger and more powerful. Most waves consist of a few melee units followed by a few ranged. Every 3rd wave an elite melee creep will spawn in addition to the regular wave.

 

Neutral Creeps are mobs that spawn belonging to neither faction in predetermined locations. In the minimap above, they are represented by the "toxic" sign. Neutral creeps are far stronger then team creeps, but provide a much larger benefit upon their defeat. Each neutral creep camp consist of 2 marauders and one special unit. The special unit is either a fire-bat, siege tank, or thor. The firebat is the easiest and provides the least minerals and the Thor is the hardest and provides the most. For the first few levels of the game, you will need your teammates to defeat these creeps. However, they quickly become easy to solo. Each neutral creep spawn location will always produce the same special unit.

 

Special creeps are the Aeon, and Daggoth. These units spawn after the first few waves at two key points along the center river and require an entire team to kill up until the very late game. The Aeon is the lesser of these two mobs and when killed provides everyone on your team 225 minerals. Daggoth is much harder, but when he is destroyed he not only gives your team a large sum of minerals but also grants the buff "blood of Daggoth." This buff improves your heroes ability to deal damage and makes killing him a big boon to large pushes.

 

In order to get experience from creeps, you must be within close proximity of them when they die. In order to get minerals from creeps, you have to "last hit" them. Last hitting means that you get the killing-blow on the creep and the kill is attributed to your hero. Aeon and daggoth are exceptions to this rule.

 

Minions: With the exception of possess creeps, minions grant no experience or minerals when killed and do not count as a kill for the hero whom killed them. There is a wide variety of minions for many different heroes, and usually they will either be close to the hero or placed in a position to scout the map. Most minions have low health pools, but moderate to high spell resistances.

 

C - Heroes!

 

Heroes are the units you play and play against. Each team has 5 players and thus 5 heroes. By using your hero, you are trying to destroy the enemies cannons and artifact to win the game while preventing them from destroying yours. Each individual hero has unique abilities and roles for accomplishing this goal. in order to help preserve diversity, each team is allowed to have a maximum of one of any given hero. Once a hero is selected, they will be grayed out from the selection screen.

 

Heroes gain experience from being near enemies when they die. Once you get enough experience, you level up. Leveling up allows you to use an ability point to either learn or improve a skill. Each skill can be 3 times after being learned, with the exception of the ultimate.

 

There are three types of heroes: Strength, Agility, and Intelligence. These are the primary stats and can be summarized thusly:

 

Strength increases health and health regen.

Agility increases attack speed and armor.

intelligence increases Energy and Energy regen.

 

Each hero has a primary, secondary, and tertiary stat. This order determines how much of each stat the hero gains upon leveling up. In addition to being the largest stat gained upon leveling up, the primary stat will grant 0.5 damage.

 

While any hero type can beat any other hero type if played correctly, I personally feel that in general it can be summarized as a "rock, paper, scissors" phenomenon. Strength typically beats intelligence, Intelligence typically beats agility, and agility typically beats strength. This is more of a personal opinion then a set in stone philosophy, so take this with a grain of salt.

 

 

D - Ability Types

There are Four different types of Abilities that your hero could potentially learn: Passive,Targeted, Centered, and Skill-shots.

 

Passive: A Passive ability is one that does not have an active effect, or cannot be clicked to be used. Rather, these are buffs that are passively on your hero. For example, if you have a passive that grants 20% spell resist it will mean you have a permanent 20% additional spell resist. All you have to do to gain that 20% is to learn the ability.

 

Targeted: Targeted abilities are those that must be used on a specific hero. For example, if your hero has an ability that allows him to snipe a specific hero for a large amount of damage you must choose which hero to snipe. To do this, you simply activate the ability and then select the target you want to use it on. If you select the hero properly, you will almost always get the spell off on them. The one exception is channeled abilities that may be out-ranged. These abilities must select a target in order to be used.

 

Centered: A centered ability is one that is based around your heroes location. For example, one hero has an ability to cause a wave of slime erupt out from his location slowing and damaging near by enemies. Occasionally a centered ability will be a temporary buff that applies very similar to a passive, but only for a small period of time. Centered abilities only need to be activated or clicked in order to use them.

 

Skill-shot: Skill shots cannot be used to target specific heroes but rather can be placed anywhere. The reason it is called a skill shot is that in order to hit someone, you have to aim your spell so that it will properly hit them. For example, an ability where a hero has to place a land-mine and can place it anywhere is a targeted ability. To use a skill-shot, you need to activate the ability then select where you want the ability to be used.

 

 

F - Ability Progression and Set-up

 

Despite filling a wide variaty of roles, Heroes have the same essential set up. The Typical cast bar looks like this (figure 1.2):

AbilityLayout_zpsd7e6fd29.png

Figure 1.2

 

Unless you rebind your hotkeys, the order of spells on your bar will be "V,Q,W,E,R,D,F." (figure 1.2). If a spell is a passive, that is to say that it does not have any active effect from being used, then it's hotkey will be unbound but the order will remain the same.

 

The heroic passive is a passive that your hero starts with, regardless of what abilities you choose to level up. For most heroes, it is an inactive effect (such as 5% bonus spell damage), but occasionally you will find heroes that have an active heroic passive. In this case, it is used just like any other ability.

 

Your core abilities (See Figure 1.2) are those that you will predominantly be using and have to learn as you level up. In order to first learn a spell, you have to spend one level-up point on the spell. You do this by opening the level up menu (Hotkey: T) after you've leveled up and selecting the spell of your choice. The different ranks or levels of abilities start locked and are slowly unlocked as you level up. To get a level 1 spell, you only need to be level 1. To upgrade a level 1 spell to level 2, you need to be level 3. To level it up again you need to be 5, then 7. Each core ability can be upgraded a total of 4 times and no more.

 

At level 6 you can learn your Ultimate. You ALWAYS want to learn and upgrade your ultimate as soon as possible. Your ultimate is a very powerful spell that usually has a long cool-down. Ultimate's can be burst damage, buffs, or coordinate with your other spells. Your ultimate cannot be upgraded to rank 2 until level 11, and rank 3 until level 16. It can only be leveled up 3 times.

 

In Aeon of storms, you cannot level up to a higher level then 18. This is to prevent players from "snowballing" or reaching such ludicrously high levels that they become unkillable late game.

 

 

E - Understanding the UI

 

Because this game has a unique UI, I decided to dedicate a section towards explaining it's layout. To your right side is the minimap and to the left side is the character screen. If you wish to switch this around, click the "Flip Interface" button in the main menu. In between these two is the ability list, your upgrade button, and your health/energy pools.

 

On your main bar (Figure 1.3) the abilities listed are in this order: You heroic passive, Your three primary moves, your ultimate, Teleport home, and your talent ability. The default hotkey settings are V, Q, W, E, R, D, F. If an ability is a passive, hitting it's respective key will do nothing. Above this is the green bar with shows your health and health regen. The purple bar shows energy and energy regen. The icon to the left of these bars is your upgrade button (Hotkey: T). The number on it is how many times you can level up an ability.

 

Side-note: Once you open up this icon, the button (Hotkey: Y) on the right side of your health bar is the choice to upgrade +6 to all stats instead of an ability. ONLY use this once you've maxed your abilities.

 

Abilitybar_zps8a49306f.png

Figure 1.3

 

To the left by default is your character screen (Figure 1.4). This includes your character portrait, items, stats, and the shop/level-up buttons. Your items are listed in the six blocks to the top-right and below is the stats. The numbers indicated from top to bottom are: Strength, Agility, Intelligence, Armor (Physical damage mitigation), Spell resist, Attack damage/attack speed, and movement speed. To learn more about how these stats works, skip to the stats section.

 

Characterscreen2_zps18154cca.png

Figure 1.4

 

When you select an enemy, a small screen will appear in the upper left (figure 1.5). This screen tells you the health, energy, resistances, damage, and movement speed.. The Icons on the enemy for each of these stats is the same as your hero screen. Additionally, it will show you all existing buffs and debuffs on the enemy.

Enemyselection_zps30656f77.png

Figure 1.5

 

Finally, at the top of the screen is the score screen. All this is indicative of is the number of hero kills for each side. For a more detailed score screen, hit the tab key. This will detail kills, death, and assist. Because it is relatively unimportant, I will not be discussing this screen.

 

 

II - Choosing your Hero

 

 

Each hero is placed into one of three categories at the hero selection screen: Strength, Agility, and Intelligence.

 

HeroSelection_zps45bf5ec3.png

Figure 2.1

 

A - Strength Heroes

Strength Heroes are sturdy heroes who stack strength to have high health pools in order to absorb damage, and are more often then not Initiators. This means that their ability set is designed to allow them to start conflict and absorb damage. Most often this is in the form of a pull/throw which allows the hero to grab enemy heroes and bring them to another location.

 

The remaining strength heroes that are not initiators are called "Bruisers." This is because they are built to take a beating and give a beating. Most of these heroes are hard to kill and can do massive damage if not dealt with properly.

 

Strength heroes are also the most noob freindly, as they allow the player to take more damage before they die.

 

B - Agility Heroes

Agility heroes are most frequently referred to as AA (Auto-attack) heroes as with very little exception, their primary source of damage is in their basic attack. Agility heroes typically have abilities for getting to the opponent and/or holding them still in order to allow you to deal the greatest amount of damage.

 

Agility heroes do massive damage, but they also do so at massive risk. This results in many agility heroes being best suited for picking off stray opponents rather then engaging in massive conflicts. This also makes them the most adept at taking down cannons quickly while others are distracted, or killing the tough strength heroes.

 

Agility heroes are more noob friendly in how to learn them, but substantially more punishing in actual game-play due to their typically low health pool.

 

SPECIAL NOTE: There currently exist three heroes in the game: Vergil (prisoner zealot), Lurker, and Rancor (ghost) who despite being labeled agility heroes are almost universally agreed upon to be best suited for Intelligence builds.

 

C - Intelligence Heroes

Intelligence heroes rely primarily on their spells to do damage and fit a wide variety of roles from laners (one who pushes lanes) too support (helps in large conflicts). Most intelligence heroes have some sort of crowd control (stuns, roots, etc.) or ability to flee quickly (blink, force-field, etc.). These heroes stack intelligence to do massive damage with their spells from a distance or help destroy enemies in group conflicts.

 

Like agility heroes, intelligence heroes usually have very low health pools and can be killed rather quickly. Because they can fill such a wide variety of roles, they typically are the hardest to learn and the hardest to play.

 

Additional Note: I have decided to forgo doing a more extensive portion on specific roles (initiator, burst, etc) as a solid guide for that already exist. You can find the guide here.

 

 

III - Talents

 

 

Talents can be found in the game by opening them with the hotkey "N." You get a total of 6 talent points to spend for any build and no more. Additionally, you have to set up your talents before you choose your hero in order for them to applied to that specific hero. Once you've made your choice of hero, you cannot change his talents.

 

Once you open the chart (Figure 3.1) you will see your name and statistics to the left and your talents to the right. At first, you can only choose the top 3 talents in either column. To unlock the 4th and 5th you need to spend at least 2 talent points in the column. To unlock the 6th you need to spend 3 points in that column.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TalentScreen2_zps4d6a17f7.png

Figure 3.1 - Seems Legit.

Spells that couldn't be described in picture above:

 

Demigod - After a kill, your next attack deals 50% additional weapon damage as spell damage. 2 second CD.

Haste - Replaces "Recover" with [Active]: +25% Timescale for 6 seconds. 3 minute CD.

Zeal - If above 70% maximum health, you gain +11% Movespeed.

Fortify - Replaces "Recover" with [Active]: +50% Physical and Spell resist for 6 seconds. 3 minute CD.

Overlord - Allied non-heroic units (team creeps and minions) in an 8 unit radius gain 40% spell and physical resist.

Transport - Replaces "recover" with [Active]: Teleports your hero to targeted allied unit after 8 second channel. 3 minute CD.

 

 

The final talents in each column are unique actives that give you a unique ability. If you do not have any of these actives, your default ability is "Recover," which will recover 60+5% of your health and energy over 6 seconds. Getting one of these will replace recover with that spell. Do to limited talents, you cannot get more then one of these spells.

 

Because talents must be set up and chosen before you pick a hero, it is recommended you set your talents up in a solo match ahead of time.

 

 

 

IV - Items

 

In this game are items that can be purchased with minerals to provide a wide variety of benefits for your heroes. Items can be purchased at the store, which you can open with the hotkey "B" or by clicking the shop building. This building is near your initial spawn and has a convenient floating icon above it. In order to purchase an item, you have to be close to the shop and have the minerals required. For each hero, at the top of the shop screen is a list of "recommended items." If you are new to the game, it is HIGHLY recommended you buy these items, in this order.

 

Most mid to late game items are made of components, or smaller pieces that provide a small fraction of the final items stats. On the right side of the shop screen (figure 3.1) when you first select an item you will see the list of components, which may even have tertiary components themselves. Each time you purchase a component the price of that item will be taken off the final price of the item. To purchase an item, double click or hit the "purchase item" button.

 

The items themselves are placed into categories based on what stats they have. This makes it easy to find what you are looking for. For example, if you want an item that gives you pure weapon damage you would click the "offense" tab, then the "Weapon Dmg" sub-tab to show all items with weapon damage in their stats.

 

ShopScreen_zps076a4b38.png

Figure 4.1

Your hero can have a total of six items including components, potions, etc. Once you hit this limit, you will not be allowed to purchase any more items. To sell an item, right-click the item and drag it over the shop building then release. This will refund you a small fraction of the cost it took to purchase the item.

 

Some items have the label [unique] while some have the label [Active]. The label [unique] means that the specific benefit listed below will not stack if you buy additional versions of this item. So if you buy Isometric Pyre which has the [unique]: Your attacks deal spell damage equal to 7% of the target's current health, the benefit will only apply once.

 

An [Active] label means that this benefit is gained when you activate (Right click) an item. This can be a benefit to your hero, or an ability. In the case of "Sunflare Gun" and items with targeted passives you must right click to activate, then select the target you want to use it on.

 

In addition, [unique] or [Active] labels may have a name attached such as [Active-Incinerate]. An [Active] or [unique] with this additional label do not stack with anything of the same label, regardless of if there effects are different. This also means different ranks of the same [Active] or [unique] on different items will not stack with each other. So [Active-Incinerate I] will not stack with [Active-Incinerate II].

 

 

 

V - How to Play 101

 

 

A- Setting Up your Hero and Choosing a lane

The first thing you want to do is, needless to say, choose your hero. As you get to learn the game you may want to experiment with different heroes to learn the game. Once you have a decent understanding of what each hero does, it is beneficial to look in the upper-right of the hero selection screen to see what your team-mates are choosing and try to pick a hero that benefits them. If they do not have a strength hero, you may want to play one to help them out.

 

After your choose your hero the first thing you need to do is buy an item and choose what you want for your first spell. Hit the level up icon in order to display all the abilities that are available and choose the one that you think will, based on it's description, be the most beneficial. Once you have a starter item (Duran's Machete, Duran's pendant, or Duran's buckler) and your first spell, it is time to choose which lane you will be fighting. Given what you know about lanes form section I-A, pick which one you think your hero is best suited too.

 

Remember, you NEVER want more then two heroes on a single lane, and if at all possible avoid forcing someone to solo the long lane. If someone steals your lane be willing to be the better man and move to another one.

 

B - The Laning Phase and Calling MIA's*

Once the first creep wave starts until around the 12 minute mark is the laning phase. During this time, the purpose is to level up and gain as much minerals as possible. It is highly unlikely you will kill a tower in this phase, but that doesn't mean there isn't a benefit to pushing the enemies back. During this time most people stay to their respective lanes and your primary worry is whoever the enemy choose to fight on your lane.

 

However, as this phase begins to end and even occasionally before hand players will begin to gank. Ganking is when you switch lanes in order to catch the enemy off guard and kill their heroes. In order to help mitigate the damage caused by an enemy gank, it is important you notice if an enemy who is laning against you goes Missing In Action (hence the term "MIA"). If you do not see a hero in your lane who was there previously, try to warn your team by calling "MIA" and inserting what lane you are in afterwards. (Example, if a Kerrigan you where fighting in top lane disappears you need to call "MIA TOP."

 

If you are struggling to fight the opponents in your lane, you will want to call for a gank from your teammates. While it is best to stay in your lanes during this phase, it is better to temporarily bring an extra teammate from another lane to help then to die. Dying is really, really bad.

 

*In EU the term "SS" (short for MISSING is used instead of MIA.)

 

C - The Mid and Late Game

Once ganks start and most heroes reach level 6 or above, the laning phase breaks down really quickly. By 15 minutes, and certianly by 20 minutes you should NOT be laning. Rather, in the mid and late game you tend to form groups of 3 or more and do large team pushes against enemy lanes. This is the point in which you try to break and over-power your enemy. Just remember, despite trying to push hard against the enemy you still want to play it safe. Push hard, but if you think you might die or get ganked back off immediately.

 

By late game, you should be moving and coordinating as an entire team. You will need to synchronize your moves in order to maximize damage against enemy heroes. It gets progressively more dangerous to be alone at this point, and in many games is straight out suicidal.

 

In short: Group up and play as a team. Gank often and push hard, but play it safe.

 

 

 

 

VI - Advanced Game-play Quick Tips

 

Tower Diving - Don't do this.

Tower Diving is a term that refers to charging into a towers range in hopes of killing a hero with low health. This strategy is primarily used by either new players or tanks, because it is VERY RISKY, Even if you know what you are doing. Many Heroes will actually count on you trying to tower dive and "bait" you into trying to kill them. They'll then use stuns, silences, or other tactics to kill you while staying alive themselves.

 

A Kill for a Kill - Also do not do this.

This means that you get a kill, but in exchange die yourself giving the enemy kills. Often times this is the result of Tower Diving or charging into an enemy team alone to kill a weak player. The reason this is a bad idea is that dying puts you further behind then getting a kill puts you ahead. The player at 0 kills and 1 death will almost always be better off then the player at 10 kills and 10 deaths. One of the reasons for this is you are more likely to miss out on "assist" bounties, and your death may allow them to push. Even if you can guarantee the kill, if you can't guarantee your survival it is not worth it. Which brings us too...

 

Watch out for Baiters.

More often then not baiting is actually unintentional by the bait themselves, but the end game is the same. baiting occurs when a player who is lower on health or an easier to kill hero lures a player out to kill him at which point his team-mates usually arrive to save him and kill you. Baiting is easy to spot and avoid once you gain enough experience. A quick checklist to see if you are being baited is:

 

-Do I know where the enemy team is on the mini-map?

-Can I catch this guy in 5 seconds or less?

-Are all my team-mates with me?

 

If you answered "no" too 2 out of 3 of those questions, you are probably being baited and I would recommend playing it safe.

 

Being the bait is also a risky move. If you are going to bait enemies, you MUST make sure that your team is close by, otherwise the person you are baiting may have a good chance at killing you. This is because being bait usually requires you to be an easy target (squishy, low health, or outnumbered). If your team-mates are preoccupied, don't expect them to come to the rescue.

 

Ganking and Getting Ganked

Usually just as players are reaching level 5 or 6 (occasionally earlier), most people will start what is known as "ganking." Ganking is when you leave your designated lane to sneak up on enemy heroes and kill them while they are unprepared. Often times, the players who are pushing lanes the hardest are also the most vulnerable to being ganked as they have the longest way to go until they are near cannons. If you see that a lane has exposed and low HP enemy heroes, it is recommend you go for a gank if they don't seem like they are going to retreat before you can make it there.

 

Getting ganked sucks, as being caught off-guard in this game usually results in an embarrassing death. This is why it is crucial that you call MIA if you see that a hero that is usually in your lane is gone, as it may mean that he is out trying to gank a team-mate. If you suspect you are in a gankable position during an MIA or are likely to be ganked, you should back off immediately. The loss of a few creep kills is not worth your death.

 

Map Awareness - The Secret to Success.

I personally spend most of my time in AoS games watching the mini-map and other players lanes. Map awareness is what separates the causal players from the pros and can win you most games (at least pubs). While it takes a long time to learn to watch other lanes and still managing your own, doing so correctly can give you almost all the information you need to get kills and avoid being killed. By watching the Mini-map you can almost always predict ganks by which heroes are missing in action and where they where last heading and can also tell which lanes on your team need the most help.

 

 

 

 

 

VII - Basic Game Mechanics and terms

 

 

 

This is a basic overview of the games mechanics in regards to the current set up.

 

A- Basic Game Mechanics:

 

Aggro - Both creeps and Cannons have a unique system of aggro. If you attack an enemy hero within range of these units they will focus fire you for a few seconds. This means that it is often a risk to attack enemy heroes if they are near cannons, even if creeps are currently taking damage.

 

Last-hitting - Last-Hitting is when a player deals the damage that brings the opponents life to zero. This is what must be done in order to get full minerals for a kill, whether it be a creep or hero. In the cases of a hero, if you don't get the last hit but help deal damage you will get an assist for a partial reward.

 

Cannons: Cannons have an aggro mechanic, and for all intents and purposes must be killed in order as you progress down a lane. Until you kill the front cannons, the ones behind them will be invincible. Cannons also deal true damage, meaning that the damage dealt cannot be mitigated by armor or spell resist. Pro-tip: Don't EVER get in range of a cannon if there are not creeps to tank it, even if you think you might kill a hero near it. They do ALOT of damage and WILL kill you.

 

Artifact: The artifact is a large building in the enemies base that is invincible until at least one lane is cleared of all towers. It functions as a large cannon with a 13 unit range and once it targets a hero will not deselect him until he is out of range. It deals massive true damage, so it is best not to piss it off unless you have a lot of health. In order to win the game, you must kill the enemies artifact.

 

Pool: The initial spawn location, or "pool" is where you spawn and is guarded by two immortal, ultra-high DPS cannons. When in your own pool, you heal rapidly and can buy items. When in your enemies pool, you die. The edge of the pool is marked by force-field. Hitting your base spell "Return" (Hotkey: D) will start an 8 second channel time. If not attacked during that time, you will Teleport to your own pool.

 

 

B - Hero and Ability Mechanics

 

Stuns, Roots, Silences, Etc. - I've been incredibly noob-friendly this guide, but if you don't know what these words mean I think I'm going to die on the inside.

 

Buffs and Debuffs - See "Stuns, Roots, and Silences."

 

Debuff immunity - If you have debuff immunity, you cannot be stunned, rooted, silenced, slowed, etc. There are some exceptions to this rule, such as from some area effects (such as Zeratuls ultimate). Debuff immunity does not stop spell or physical damage.

 

Auto-attacking - Self explanatory, the basic attack that comes with your hero. ALL auto-attacks deal physical damage, although items and abilities can add additional spell damage on top of it.

 

Spells - Spells and abilities almost universally do spell damage, with little exception. They also almost universally increase based on a specific stats. For example, an ability that does 50[+50% INT] damage will do 50 damage + 50% of your total Intellect. So if you have 300 intellect, the ability does [50+300/2] or 200 damage.

 

Damage over time vs. Damage per second - There are two types of damage over time (DoT) spells, which means that the effect spreads out it's total damage over a few seconds of time. The first type is damage over time, which is best expressed by tool-tips that say things such as: "Deals 200(+80%INT) over 4 seconds." This means that the damage is divided between the number of seconds. So in this example every second for 3 seconds they would take 50(+20%INT) damage.

 

Damage per second spells works the other way around. Rather then giving you a total number, it tells you how much damage it does per second. This is represented by tool-tips that say something such as "Deals 65(+20%INT) every second for 6 seconds." Usually damage over time spells do quicker damage while damage per second spells do more damage.

 

Cool-down - This is the time it takes for an ability to be available for use again. A 25 second cool-down on an ability means that once used, the player must wait 25 seconds to use it again.

 

Charges - Spells that have "Charges" will recover one charge at an interval equal to it's cool-down, up to it's maximum amount of charges. If you have more then one charge, you can use the spell in rapid succession without a cool-down in-between.

 

 

 

 

VIII - Stat Mechanics

 

 

 

Agility - Each point grants 0.11 armor and 0.3% weapon speed.

 

Strength - Each point grants 10 health, and 0.04 Health regen.

 

Intelligence - Each point grants 7 energy, and 0.015 energy regen.

 

Damage Types - There are three types of damage in this game: Physical damage, Spell damage, and True Damage. Physical damage is damage that is mitigated by armor, but can leach health with the leech stat. Spell damage is mitigated by spell resist. True damage is unmitigated by anything.

 

Armor - Armor is based of an equation that churns out a final physical resistance. While the the tag line is "Each point of armor grants 3% resist" this actually means that [Physical damage taken = (0.97^Armor)(incoming Physical damage)]. So 10 armor would not equal 30% physical resist, but rather approximately 27%.

 

Spell Resist - While spell resist is gained through a stat, it still stacks in the same way armor does. So 20% spell resist means you take 80% of regular spell damage. If you have one piece that has 20% spell resist, and one that has 15%, then you take a total of [0.8x0.85=0.68], or 68% of regular spell damage. Each hero starts with a base of 20% spell resist.

 

Cooldown Reduction - Cool-down Reduction works by every second increasing the amount of time that has passed by X amount. For example, 20% Cool-down reduction means that every second, 0.2 seconds is taken off your abilities cooldown. This also means that it is not possible to have a cool-down of less then a second with CD reduction alone.

 

Attack Speed - Like everything else, attack speed stacks non-linear. So having two items with 20% attack speed would equate to [1-(0.8)(0.8)=36], or 36% attack speed. However, unlike the other stats which have a soft cap (meaning that the benefit of stacking reaches the point where it no longer is of any real use), attack speed has a hard cap. After 400% attack speed you will not attack any faster. This number is usually around 0.40-0.5 attack speed and is reached with relative ease. After you reach max attack speed, it cannot be made any faster with additional attack speed.

 

Leech/Lifesteal - Lifesteal causes all PHYSICAL DAMAGE dealt to give you health equal to damage dealth x lifesteal. Leech stacks linearily, meaning two items with 15% leach stack for a total of 30% of damage dealt. Because it is damage dealt, armor mitigates how much is leached. Spell damage and true damage do not leech. Additionally, leach constitutes as healing meaning items that reduce amount healed will effect leach.

 

Critical Strike - Your base critical strike causes your attack to do 50% physical damage dealt (after mitigation) as additional damage. So, if you have a 200 damage basic attack and get a critical strike (with base 50% Crit damage) on a player with 50% physical resist you do [(200(0.5))PD+(200(0.5)x50)TD], or 100 physical damage and 50 true damage. Items and spells that increase critical strike damage do so in a linear manner. So a 25% bonus critical strike damage item on a hero would cause critical strike to do 75% physical damage dealt as true damage.

 

Critical Strike Chance - Heroes start with a 0% critical strike chance, and can only get it through items. Critical strike chance stacks linearly as well. So, one item with a 15% critical strike chance and a second with 20% would grant a total of 35% critical strike chance. Getting above 100% critical strike chance has no additional benefit.

 

Healing - Healing is essentially health returned that is not done through regeneration. All health gained through leech or abilities is considered healing.

 

Movement speed - Movement speed is linear and fairly easy to compute. For example: An item with 0.15 movement speed increases your speed by 0.15.

 

Timescale - Time is rarely used stat that affects every time-related stat on your character. He attacks X amount faster, moves X amount faster, and has his cool-downs take shorter, etc. For example, 20% time increases attack speed by 20%, movement speed by 20%, and reduces CD's by 20%. This increase ignores all caps, making time the only way to get more then 400% attack speed. Time is a rare stat in the game and exist only on three items and within a handful of ultimates.

 

Shields - Shields only exist on a few heroes. Shields can only be gained through specific spells and usually time-out after a few seconds.

 

Sex-Appeal - Alright, i'll admit this isn't an actual stat in the game but it really should be. I mean, Egon Stetman clearly deserves a bonus rating of +8 Sex appeal, right?

 

 

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"Sex-Appeal - Alright, i'll admit this isn't an actual stat in the game but it really should be. I mean, Egon Stetman clearly deserves a bonus rating of +8 Sex appeal, right?" I prefer balrog myself, but if unix could infest nova....

 

I agree, Egon is too sexy for the ladies.

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Its 400% Attack Speed cap!

 

And Viron has the most Sex-Appeal of all ... things ...

Fixed, and that was actually my original joke. Unfortunately, it occurred to me that no new player would know who Viron actually was, so I went with a character that had a recognizable name.

 

A good guide, very nice.

 

Please mention that towers do true damage.

Thanks, and done.

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very nice guide;

 

time should be changed to timescale, it also exists on 3 items not 2 and should be explained that it stacks multiplicative

 

also a short bit in laning about denying creep would be good

 

leech doesnt really exist its changed to lifesteal unless you play balrog

and how armour mitigation works with it should get a mention

 

why is warding not the most basic essential part of the game? 75 minerals just keep 1 in the river on your lane side ALL GAME

 

also you didnt make mention of talent points

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Fixed, and that was actually my original joke. Unfortunately, it occurred to me that no new player would know who Viron actually was, so I went with a character that had a recognizable name.

 

 

Thanks, and done.

I hated viron so much that he gets negative sex appeal for that...

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VI - Stat Mechanics

 

 

 

Agility - Each point grants 0.11 armor and 0.3% weapon speed.

 

Strength - Each point grants 10 health, and 0.04 Health regen.

 

Intelligence - Each point grants 7 energy, and 0.015 energy regen.

 

Shields - Shields only only exist on a few heroes, and have no armor or spell resist. Shields can only be gained through specific spells and usually time-out after a few seconds.

 

 

 

 

Correct me if I'm wrong but I thought agility points etc were subjected to diminishing returns principle (might be wrong here I just remember being told points don't work linearly). Also only repeated twice.

 

Above all else nice guide!

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Correct me if I'm wrong but I thought agility points etc were subjected to diminishing returns principle (might be wrong here I just remember being told points don't work linearly). Also only repeated twice.

 

Above all else nice guide!

 

The points themselves are linear; 1 point of stat will always give you the same benefit. However, it's attack rate bonuses in particular that stack in a non-linear manner. Actually, it's the opposite of diminishing returns. Attack rate bonuses have magnifying returns so your net bonus is actually greater than the mere sum of bonuses. For example, each point of Agi gives you +0.29% attack rate so with 30 points of agility, your attack rate becomes Base_Rate * 0.2930 = Base_Rate * 1.0908; a 9.08% bonus to DPS, whereas the sum of 30x 0.29 bonuses would be 8.7%. Further attack speed bonuses also apply in the same manner so, from that 1.0908 bonus from Agi, getting a 25% bonus would yield 1.0908 * 1.25 = 1.3636; a 36.36% bonus.

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Correct me if I'm wrong but I thought agility points etc were subjected to diminishing returns principle (might be wrong here I just remember being told points don't work linearly). Also only repeated twice.

 

Above all else nice guide!

It's not agility that has diminishing returns it's what you get from agility that is subject to <magnified> returns as Mk explained. Edited by Midknight
Fixed it for you
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VI - Stat Mechanics

 

 

 

Armor - Armor is based of an equation that churns out a final physical resistance. While the the tag line is "Each point of armor grants 3% resist" this actually means that [Physical damage taken = (0.97^Armor]%. So 10 armor would not equal 30% physical resist, but rather approximately 27%.

 

You are missing some brackets in your equation.

 

Let y be the physical damage taken, x be the incoming physical damage and a be the amount of armour on the target.

 

Then y = (0.97^a)x

 

Attack Speed - Like everything else, attack speed stacks non-linear. So having two items with 20% attack speed would make you attack at 64% your normal rate. However, unlike the other stats which have a soft cap (meaning that the benefit of stacking reaches the point where it no longer is of any real use), attack speed has a hard cap. After 400% attack speed you will not attack any faster. This number is usually around 0.40-0.5 attack speed and is reached with relative ease. After you reach max attack speed, it cannot be made any faster with additional attack speed.

 

Two items each giving +20% attack speed actually results in +44% attack speed. Since 1.2*1.2 = 1.44. I'm pretty certain that this is correct, since increasing attack speed actually results in reducing the cool-down in-between attacks.

 

Movement speed - Movement speed follows the same pattern of exponential growth. The difference is that instead of decreasing with additional benefits, it increases. So 20% movement speed is a multiplier of 1.2. Having two buffs with 20% movement speed would mean [1.2x1.2 =1.44], resulting in a 44% increase in movement speed instead of a 40%.

 

Most of the time, however, movement speed will be slowed instead of speed up. Slowing movement speed works on the same curve as everything else.

 

The stacking isn't exponential it's just multiplicative.

 

Time - Time is rarely used stat that affects every time-related stat on your character. He attacks X amount faster, moves X amount faster, and has his cool-downs take shorter, etc. For example, 20% time increases attack speed by 20%, movement speed by 20%, and reduces CD's by 20%. This increase ignores all caps, making time the only way to get more then 450% attack speed. Time is a rare stat in the game and exist only on two items and within a handful of ultimates.

 

The attack speed cap is 400%.

 

 

 

 

Open the spoiler.

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Hm, someone actually trying to help noobs :D

 

Usually when you are in a pub and you have a noob, other ppl just rage as if there guide to beginners was:

 

How to teach a Noob:

Step 1: Tell them to leave. If Step 1 fails, proceed to Step 2.

 

Step 2: Rage Quit

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The inherent problem is that people either want to learn or they don't want to learn. If they want to learn, even with limited, fragmented, incomplete information, they'll dig and find what there is. In the absence of existing info, they'll discover it for themselves. But for people who don't want to learn, you could compile every little scrap of info on the subject and present it to them in a perfectly understandable manner on a silver platter and with an AI program that will instruct them in the voice of Morgan Freeman... and they'll still resist learning by any method short of having a USB port connected directly to their brain and having the info directly loaded up via flash drive.

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The inherent problem is that people either want to learn or they don't want to learn. If they want to learn, even with limited, fragmented, incomplete information, they'll dig and find what there is. In the absence of existing info, they'll discover it for themselves. But for people who don't want to learn, you could compile every little scrap of info on the subject and present it to them in a perfectly understandable manner on a silver platter and with an AI program that will instruct them in the voice of Morgan Freeman... and they'll still resist learning by any method short of having a USB port connected directly to their brain and having the info directly loaded up via flash drive.

 

Some people like to learn the hard way, these are the people who even after 500+ games still build machette into durans eye on zera.

 

Edit: Just realised that all recommended got changed, so maybe these noobs will do a bit better now.

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